Linux performance

Discussion in 'Hardware, Software, Tech' started by Barugon, May 3, 2022.

  1. Barugon

    Barugon Avatar

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    There are two main areas that I have found to massively affect performance on Linux and I thought that I would share it here.

    The first is SMP (symmetric multi-processing, also called hyper-threading). SMP helps a lot of multi-threaded stuff go faster but for games it can actually degrade performance. This seems to be especially true for SotA. With SMP enabled I get a pretty severe drop in framerate.

    If you don't want to disable SMP in the BIOS (it is beneficial for many things) then you can run this in order to disable it before running SotA:
    Code:
    echo off | sudo tee -a /sys/devices/system/cpu/smt/control
    Change "off" to "on" in order to enable it after you're done playing SotA (if you want, that is; it will reset after rebooting).

    You can check if it's enabled by running...
    Code:
    cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/smt/active
    The other major performance hit that I recently discovered is Wayland. If you want a decent framerate then use Xorg. Actually, you should try both as Wayland might work better with different graphics drivers.

    [edit] If you're using a Gnome desktop then there should be a gear icon on the login screen that has choices for "Gnome" and "Gnome on Xorg" (or "Ubuntu" and "Ubuntu on Xorg"). I tried to get a screenshot but it's involved to do that on GDM (the login screen).
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2022
  2. Sentinel2

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    Excellent tip. thanks!

    I'll give it a try next time I'm online gaming. SMP is great but can have it's draw backs :D
     
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  3. Barugon

    Barugon Avatar

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    The Wayland performance issues seem to have been fixed, at least with Fedora 36.
     
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